Using Room 217 Music

Room 217 music care resources are research-informed and designed for caregivers to use, whether they are musically trained or not.

Introducing the Room 217’s music into personal care situations requires intention. Here are some practical considerations.

  1. How will the music be played? Do I need to bring a CD/DVD player, computer or iPod and headphones?
  2. Who are the people in the room and what is their musical background and preferences?
  3. What is the desired effect of the music? i.e. relaxation? reminiscence? sleep promotion?
  4. Offer the music with a question i.e. “Do you feel like some music today?” or a statement, “Here is some music that might help you relax, or sleep.”
  5. What is the response? Has the music made a change?

When integrating Room 217 music into programs with groups, consider the following.

  1. Is the room set up for everyone to be able to hear/see?
  2. Who are the people in the room and what music would bring them together?
  3. What is the desired effect of the music? i.e. engagement? reminiscence? activation?
  4. Offer the music with an introduction i.e. “Today, we are going to sing some songs about spring” or “Today, we are going to listen to some classical music.”
  5. What is the response? Has the music made a change?

Room 217 music can be used in a variety of contexts, including hospice palliative care, long term care, retirement homes, day programs, hospitals, schoolrooms, day cares, and private homes.
Room 217 music has been used in countless ways, including for:

Soothing Relief – relaxation, sleep, de-stress, comfort, touch therapies
 
Supportive Care – rejuvenating caregivers, sleep promotion, code lavenders, palliative and end of life care, grief and bereavement support, pain distraction, passive therapy, life review and reminiscence, tinnitus relief, convalescence, coma stimulation, visitation, quiet rooms, quiet background i.e. funeral homes, treatment rooms, surgery, waiting rooms, organ transplant transition and recovery rooms, with other activities i.e. painting, writing, sewing, enroute to/from appointments, pet companionship or bereavement
 
Spiritual Encouragement – meditation, contemplation, worship, spiritual support
 
Engagement – activation, participation, movement, orientation
 
…as well as library loans, In Memoriam gifts, and care basket items.